All posts filed under: Adventurers

The nomadic adventure.

A breton in Ireland

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Erwan is a breton of 25 years. He’s also a Breton from Belle-île, and there aren’t very many of those! We met him on the ferry between Brittany and Ireland. We looked at the Irish map together whilst lying on the carpet between two bouts of insomnia. Erwan has several identities: to start, he’s Breton; a seasonal restaurant worker; international sound system examiner; plumber; future offshore welder; and more recently, a surf fanatic. He started surfing two years ago and hasn’t been able to stop since. He has taken 10 days of holiday, 4 days in Brittany and 6 in Ireland looking for the most coveted spots. He’s travelling in a little white 205 that is sparsely but efficiently equipped. The rear seat and passenger seat have been folded flat leaving just enough space to slide in two surfboards hidden under a white sheet. There is a foam mattress behind the passenger seat. When it’s time to go to bed, he lays his seat down flat, rolls out the mattress all the way to the …

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Rémi Berchet

Rémi Berchet, concerto for freerider

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Far from here, many years ago, my high school music teacher had a tatty ponytail (although I have nothing against ponytails), a pale face (nor against pale faces, I might add) and obsessive doggedness about perfect rhythm on the recorder (but here, I draw the line…). But that was far away… and a long time ago. In short, a far cry from what the high school pupils in Bourg Saint Maurice (Savoie) see when their music teacher, Rémi Berchet, enters the classroom. Rémi is a solo mountaineer, who lives for his passions: skiing in winter, running in summer. Last August, Rémi was on the starting line of the magnificent TDS (Traces des Ducs de Savoie) race, which covers 119km of GR hike paths in the Mont Blanc region. This year, he completed the 7,250m positive height gain in just 15 hours, 13 minutes and 40 seconds, finishing just outside the top three! But now that winter is here again, Rémi can rest his feet in his ski boots, before, without a doubt, climbing the last few …

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Race

Taking it easy in a deckchair

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The deckchair is a piece of historic social heritage. Thanks are due to Léon B. and his party the Front P. which, in 1936, were thoughtful enough to introduce paid holidays and, at the same time, the deckchair trend. Beaches were filled with a vast sea of brightly coloured canvas stretched over reclining wood frames, replacing the rattan chairs of yesteryear. Besides being part of our social heritage, the deckchair is also an apocope in France. The French term for deckchair, “transat”, is in fact a phonetic modification of “transatlantique”, as these chairs were first used on the liners that crossed the Atlantic. Make no mistake, that is what it’s all about: the solo Atlantic crossing by Armand de Jacquelot in Mini 6,50, the world’s smallest offshore racing yacht. And the vast expanse of stretched canvas becomes a large blue spinnaker. Abracadabra. Armand, skipper of n°755 We-Van, was present on Saturday 19 September 2015 at the start of the famous Minitransat race from Douarnenez to Pointe- à-Pitre. He started designing boats as a boy and …

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Gold of Bengal

Nomad of the Seas, or the low-tech adventure.

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The Nomad of the Sea project has its origins in plant-life, where all is well and good. 2009. Corentin de Chatelperron works in Bangladesh at a naval construction site and like all good engineers, is constantly thinking. The material which it seems simply has to be used in the construction of boats, fibreglass, is the root of the problem. Corentin dreams of replacing this imported, expensive, polluting composite material with jute fibre. Jute (Corchorus capsularis), a local, abundant foodstuff, possesses stunning technological characteristics. Applied science requires Corentin to make his theoretical reflections into a practical reality and he did this by building the first boat made of both fibre and jute fibre. Applied science? He returned to France from Bangladesh on this little sailing boat all alone, on a journey lasting 186 days over 9,000 miles (16,700 km). “The adventure of Tara Tari” helped him earn the credibility and fame to found Gold of Bengal. This research and development project focussed on jute led to the creation of a second boat in 2013 made from 100% agrocomposite materials reinforced with natural jute fibres. During these different nomadic …

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