All posts tagged: we-van

Just a night in a yurt

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While admiring the sunset in Korka, we spot this uncommon tent. Planted at the edge of the pine forest overlooking the sea, this big white canvas shape intrigues us. When we get closer to it, we discover the owners speak French. We talk for a little bit and find ourselves invited to share honey tisane inside this teepee-yurt, as Guillaume and Marianne call their shelter. They’ve left their tent and car in Latvia, continuing their adventure to Mongolia on the Trans-Siberian. They’re travelling with Attiloé, their one and a half-year-old daughter who looks like she’s perfectly comfortable with this nomadic environment and this chance encounter. Manu is also here. He’s a friend of the little family who has come to travel a leg of the journey with them. The tent is spacious and comfortable, even for 5 adults. We listen with rapt attention as they recount their Russian and Mongolian adventures and admire their backpacking journey with such a young child. Far from being a hindrance, Attiloé has often been their “joker”. Her big blue …

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The calming cream

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Calming cream for bites, redness, itching! Ingredients: – plantain leaves – olive oil (cold-pressed virgin extract, preferably organic) – beeswax recipe: Fill a jar with chopped plantain leaves. Cover the leaves with olive oil, close the jar and let macerate three weeks. After 3 weeks, heat the wax in a pan until liquefied Strain out the chopped leaves, add the filtered fluid to the liquid wax. Mix in the pan, pour into the bottle and shake the mixture until it thickens. Apply directly to skin whenever needed!

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Baltic feelings

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The landscapes are flat… very flat. Everything is flat, even Peipous Lake, the 5th largest lake in Europe, which is never deeper than 15 m! And Bertrand adds: “Flat landscapes are boring. On the one hand, we can see a long way, but on the other hand, there’s not enough height to get a better view point. It’s challenging to get good photos. ” He isn’t very inspired by the Baltic countryside and has trouble deciding where to aim his lens, especially when he thinks about the stunning Scandinavian panoramas. — Bertrand is kind and I’m conciliatory. We are both profoundly averse to conflict. But every once in a while, we get on each other’s nerves. It’s not easy to be with your other half 24/7 in 6 m2. Today the argument was over what we should or shouldn’t take photos of. Bertrand, the artist, focuses on quality and doesn’t see the point of taking a photo of something he says is “useless”. Me, the hyperactive, would rather have too many than too few. I’m …

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Perchs & herrings in the Finnish way

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Kala keittö (pronounced kala’ keïteuh) Fish soup Ingredients Fish: kala Perch: ahven (pronounced ah’rven) Potatoes: peruna (pronounced perrona) Sweet potatoes: batatti (pronounced batat’ti) Onion: sipuli (pronounced sipoli) Ginger: inkivääri (pronounced inkivairi) Vegetable stock cube: vihannes liemi kuutio (pronounced vianess lieymi koutïo) Dill: tilli Method Bring a large pan of water to the boil Gut and descale the fish Cut the potatoes and sweet potatoes into large cubes. Slice the onions and finely chop the dill. Cut the ginger into small cubes. When the water boils, add the stock cube, potatoes and sweet potatoes. Wait 10 minutes before adding the onion, dill and ginger. Wait another 5 minutes before adding the fish whole to the soup, head first so that the tail is not submerged 20 minutes later, it’s ready! Alternative recipe: perch on the wood fire… No comment! Sinappisilli Herring and mustard sauce Ingredients Sinappisilli (a traditional Finnish sauce made with herring and mustard) Dill: tilli Potatoes: peruna (pronounced perrona) Method Bring some water to the boil and add the potatoes. When they are cooked …

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Nomadic feelings

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#1 Taking a Break It’s been almost 3 months since we left Nantes. We’ve driven 18,489 km through 12 countries, taken more than 8,000 photos, and written more than 65,000 words. We haven’t wasted any time. We’ve seen things, met people, tasted delicacies, tried out activities. We’ve thrown ourselves 100% into this trip and never forget how lucky we are. We’re moving every day, taking roads, ferries, tunnels, and bridges, marking them on our map. But lately we’ve felt the urge to stop, set up camp, take our time, stay more than a few hours or one night at a place. In the first three months of this road trip, we realise there have only been two days when we weren’t driving. We’ve decided to add a third! We’ll find a pretty and welcoming spot and we’ll stay there for one, two or maybe even three days. Before that happens, though, it will have to stop raining and get warmer than 10° because these conditions don’t really lend themselves to curling up in a hammock …

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The blower of Fano

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You never know what you’ll find on Fanø island. On Nordby’s main road, a pretty house with coloured windows hides at the back of a small courtyard. This is where glass blower Charlotte La Cour lives and works. Despite what her name might suggest, Charlotte is definitely Danish and only speaks a little French learned during her travels. She has been a glass blower for 20 years, 16 of which have been on Fanø. The first things you see when entering her boutique/workshop are the large glass-making furnaces. The largest and hottest is 1130° and stays lit around the clock because it takes an entire week to bring it up to the right temperature. She only turns it off when she goes on holiday. She gets her glass from the United States in small, ice cube-sized blocks. She melts these in the large furnace and the molten glass turns honey-coloured. Ronja, her daughter and assistant, uses a large rod to collect a bubble of melted glass that Charlotte kneads and forms into the desired shape. …

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Islander [2/2] – honesty & rugby

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Tom, Flora and their two children live in Laggan, just a kilometer away of Lochbuie and the farm. Before moving to the Isle of Mull, Tom and Flora managed a company offering classic Volkswagen camper vans from the 60s and 70s for hire. “Happy Highlands Campers” was based in Inverness. Flora managed the 4 vans and Tom carried out the repairs. The couple are true fans of the roadtrip concept and are delighted to tour our van, “Patrick”. They settled in Lochbuie five years ago. Tom helped his father manage the farm. He also told us about his former adventures, as a farmer in the Australian desert, as an engineer working in Antarctica for 18 months, as a wind turbine repair technician… Flora wears many different hats. She manages the rental annex and the two holiday cottages, she helps manage the abattoir on the island, she drives the local children to and from school, and she has opened an “honesty shop” in the former post office in Lochbuie. For this project, she brought together local craftsmen …

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